Wearable computing that isn’t

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It’s not just me then. I bought a Nike Fuel Band a while back to see if it worked. It did. I walked a bit more. The dog often went out twice rather than once. But then it started to feel like another thing to worry about. And those “Go Richard!” messages can get really annoying. Half of American adults who own an activity tracker no longer use it, and one third who have owned a wearable product stopped using it within six months according to Mike Merrill, writing for The Big Think.

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2 Responses to Wearable computing that isn’t

  1. Bradley says:

    I read recently that fitness and diet apps are used when their users are improving athletically, but then tail off once users plateau or decline in levels of fitness. I.e. they serve as a positive reinforcement, but are not in themselves a motivator.

  2. hupovoy says:

    to the theme of your favorite libraries. in Japan. http://www.nippon.com/en/people/e00047/

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